LitWits book group meets every four to six weeks at Reading Matters. We’re a friendly group reading both modern and classics. Check our news pages for the date of our next meeting.

Next meeting Thursday 2nd November at 7.30pm

Hotel du Lac  by Anita Brookner Booker Prize Winner in 1984,

‘The Hotel du Lac was a dignified building, a house of repute, a traditional establishment, used to welcoming the prudent, the well-to-do, the retired, the self-effacing, the respected patrons of an earlier era. Into the rarefied atmosphere of the Hotel du Lac timidly walks Edith Hope, romantic novelist and holder of modest dreams. Edith has been exiled from home after embarrassing herself and her friends. She has refused to sacrifice her ideals and remains stubbornly single. But among the pampered women and minor nobility Edith finds Mr Neville, and her chance to escape from a life of humiliating loneliness is renewed . . .

Review to follow

 

Into The Water by Paula Hawkins

The addictive new psychological thriller from the author of The Girl on the Train, the runaway Sunday Times No. 1 bestseller and global phenomenon.

In the last days before her death, Nel called her sister. Jules didn’t pick up the phone, ignoring her plea for help. Now Nel is dead. They say she jumped. With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, satisfying read that hinges on the stories we tell about our pasts and their power to destroy the lives we live now.

Review by Jo: This was a very confusing read with the narrative shifting from 1679 to 1983 and 2015. Altogether there were 11 different points of view from various characters. I was halfway through before I got to grips with it. It did get better towards the end but like Girl on the Train I couldn’t identify with any of the characters so I didn’t really care what happened to them!   

 

Cast Iron by Peter May

Book 6 in the Enzo Macleod series. In 1989, a killer dumped the body of twenty-year-old Lucie Martin into a picturesque lake in the West of France. Fourteen years later, during a summer heatwave, a drought exposed her remains – bleached bones amid the scorched mud and slime, but no one was ever convicted of her murder. Now, forensic expert Enzo Macleod is reviewing this stone-cold case – the toughest of those he has been challenged to solve, he opens a Pandora’s box that raises old ghosts and endangers his entire family.

Review by Fiona: I didn’t think this was one of Peter May’s best. Usually he is very good at evoking setting but although the action is set in France I didn’t really get a sense of being in a foreign place. It took me time to get to know the different characters and their relationships, up to that point it was quite confusing. I did get more into the plot as it progressed but I found it an unchallenging read.  

 

Rupture by Ragnar Jonasson

1955. Two young couples move to the uninhabited, isolated fjord of Hedinsfjorour. Their stay end abruptly when one of the women meets her death. The case is never solved. Fifty years later an old photograph comes to light which suggests that the couples may not have been alone after all.

A distinctive blend of Nordic Noir and Golden Age detective fiction…. a economical and evocative prose, as well as some masterful prestidigitation.

Review by Vivienne: In this third offering by Ragnar Jónasson, Icelandic policeman Ari Thor is investigates a cold case from the fifties – the death of a young woman in an isolated fjord valley. Helping him in this endeavour is Isrún, a young news reporter fighting her own demons (she is suffering from a debilitating illness), who is also investigating a case of her own with links to the Icelandic political elite. Disappointingly, the threads of these stories fail to come together to a satisfying finale, which left some readers (myself included) slightly confused. On the other hand, Jónasson continues to open enticing windows on contemporary Iceland for us (waffles and apple puree with skyr sounds good to me!).

Also by the author Snow Blind and Night Blind

 

ruth-elizabeth-gaskellRuth by Elizabeth Gaskell

The author was born in London in 1810 but spent her formative years in Cheshire, Stratford-upon-Avon and the north of England.

Ruth is a novel about grief and shame. In Victorian times a fallen woman is viewed with neither compassion or sympathy. Losing her job and cast out of her home, she bears her child.

Offered the chance of a new life with people who love and respect her, they are at first unaware of her secret. When the father of her child re-enters her life she has to choose between social acceptance and personal pride.

 

dark-placesDark Places by Gillian Flynn

Author of Gone Girl, Gillian’s Dark Places has been described as Wonderful  . . .  eerily macabre The story of Libby day who was just seven years old when her evidence puts her brother behind bars. Rightly or wrongly? That is what she has had to live with for 24 years after her family was slaughtered.

 

 

dalloway

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

One of the few genuine innovations in the history of the novel

Clarrisa Dalloway, elegant and vivacious, is preparing for a party and remembering those she once loved. In another part of London, Septimus Warren Smithis shell-shocked and on the brink of madness.

Past, present and future are brought together one momentous day in June 1923.

(Michael  Cunningham’s novel, The Hours, concerns three generations of women affected by this novel by Virginia Woolf.)

 

glorious heresiesThe Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInnerney

This is the book chosen to read over the summer break, copies are still available in the shop.

The winner of the 2016 Bailey’s Prize for Women’s Fiction, this is Lisa’s debut novel. Don’t be put off by some of the comments on the cover, it is a superb debut from a new ‘comic’ writer.

Maureen didn’t mean to kill a man, but what can a poor dear do when she is surprised by an intruder and has only a holy stone to hand?                                        

TheHeartIsALonelyHunterThe Heart is a Lonely Place

Carson McCullers’ novel is a powerful exploration of alienation and loneliness in 1930s America. Set in a small town in the middle of the deep South, it is the story of John Singer, a lonely deaf-mute, and a disparate group of people who are drawn towards his kind, sympathetic nature. Moving, sensitive and deeply humane, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter explores loneliness, the human need for understanding and the search for love.

WideSargassoSea

Wide Sargasso Sea & Night Blind

Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys. This classic study of betrayal, a seminal work of postcolonial literature, is Jean Rhys’s brief, beautiful masterpiece.

 

nightblingNight Blind is the second novel in the Dark Iceland series by Ragnar Jonasson. Dark, chilling and complex this is an extraordinary thriller from an undeniable new talent.

Night Blind Review by Jean

The second in the Dark Iceland series with three more to come – I can’t wait.In the first book, Snowblind, Ari Thor is transferred to this small fishing village as the local police officer. He has difficulty adjusting to the isolation after Reykjavik, although he starts to feel safe in the total darkness of winter. In this second book his skills as a police officer are clear as he investigates the murder of his Inspector. He has trauma in his past, his relationship with Kirsten is complicated and rocky but their small son is possibly the common ground which may yet keep them together.

theredhouseThe Red House

From Mark Haddon the author of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night – Time and A Spot of Bother this is a superb book about families and secrets. Two families. Seven days. One house.

This is a novel that is funny, poignant and deeply insightful about human lives.

 

The Girl With All The Gifts by M R Carey

girlwithgiftsEmotionally charged and gripping from beginning to end but with a heart-warming tenderness is how this book is described as well as tense and fast-paced.

Not every gift is a blessing, every morning Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class and Sergeant Parks keeps his gun pointed at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair, she thinks they don’t like her. She jokes that she won’t bite but they don’t laugh – Melanie is a very special girl.

A God in Every Stone

Summer 1914. Young Englishwoman Vivien Rose Spencer is in an ancient land about to discover the Temple of Zeus, the call of adventure and love. Thousands of miles away a twenty year old Pathan, Qayyam Gul, is learning about brotherhood and loyalty in the British Indian Army. Summer 1915 Viv has been separated from the man she loves; Qayyam has lost an eye at Ypres.They meet on a train to Peshawar unaware that a connection is to be forged between their lives.

The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters

Sunday Times Fiction Book of the Year 2015, Winner of The Independent Bookshop Book Award 2015.

                                  Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

farfromthemaddingcrowdAn attention seeking valentine sets off on the toss of a hymn book bringing about a course of events which have dire consequences for the recipient and his rival in the quest for the affections of a beautiful woman.

However, as a result of this, she marries a shepherd with a predelection for leather leggings, large boots and an ill-keeping timepiece. 

What would Mr Hardy have thought of this review of his novel!?

 

All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews

‘A tragicomedy with back biting black humour.’ Elfrieda von Riessen, or Elf, is an exquisite beauty, adored wife and world famous concert pianist. Younger sister Yoland, known as Yoli, is a semi-failed writer, with teenage children from separate marriages, in the throes of a second divorce.

Ostensibly favoured, Elf possesses a death-wish that persists throughout this remarkable novel. Full of eccentricities and casual apposite quoting of literature, its tragicomedy and humaneness recall the best of John Irving. Toews incorporates her Canadian Mennonite background into all her fiction.

The biting black humour in the ‘I need you’ declaration in a text message from Yoli’s estranged husband, followed by a second message ‘to sign the divorce papers’ is set against Elf’s morbid love of the Romantic poets – the book’s title is from a Coleridge poem lamenting his lost sister.

Our Man in Havana by Graham Greene

Wormold is a vacuum cleaner salesman in a city of power cuts. His adolescent daughter  ourmaninhavanaspends his money with amazing skill so when a mysterious Englishman offers him an extra income he’s tempted. All he has to do is carry out a little espionage and file a few reports, but when his fake reports start coming true Havana is suddenly a very threatening place.

 

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

inventionofwingsBy the author of The Secret life of Bees, this latest book is an extraordinary novel about two exceptional women. Sarah is the middle daughter, the one her mother calls difficult and her father calls remarkable.

On Sarah’s eleventh birthday, hetty is taken from the slave quarters she shares with her mohter, wrapped in lavender ribbons and presented to Sarah as a gift. Sarah knows what she does next will unleash a world of trouble. She also knows she cannot accept.

This powerful, sweeping novel, inspired by real events, and set in the deep south of nineteenth century America, it evokes a shocking contrasts of beauty and ugliness, of righteous people living with daily cruelty they fail to recognise and celebrates the power of friendship.


I Am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes

Pilgrim is the codename for a man who doesn’t exist. The adopted son of a wealthy American family, he once headed up a secret espionage unit for US Intelligence. Before he disappeared into anonymous retirement, he wrote the definitive book on forensic criminal investigation. But that book will come back to haunt him.

The Goddess Chronicle by Natsuo Kirino

On an island the shape of a teardrop live two sisters. One is the oracle, the other is damned. One is admired far and wide.The other must sacrifice her life to fulfil her destiny. But what will happen when she returns to the island for revenge?

Burial Rites by Hannah Kent

Short listed for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction 2014, Hannah Kent’s tightly plotted debut leaves its reader immersed in the Icelandic winter of 1829.

In 1829, the last public execution in Iceland took place (you can see the specially commisioned axe in the National Museum in Reykjavik) . A man and a woman were beheaded for a murder committed on a remote farm. There being no prisons in Iceland, the condemned woman had been held for the winter before her execution at a farm where she’d lived as a young girl, guarded by the farmer’s wife and daughters. This is the story of that winter.

The allure of the tale is obvious and one can see why Hannah Kent was haunted by it. The dynamics of a small group of people on an isolated farmstead are disrupted by the arrival of a disturbing stranger who turns out to be uncomfortabley familiar. The landscape of Iceland casts its spell and the tension of Agnes’s approaching death builds from the first sentence: ‘They said I must die ……’

This is not a cheerful read and I’m glad I read it in the spring sunshine rather than the dark depths of winter! But it is beautiful, haunting and compelling writing. Based on real-life events in the 19th century Iceland. The story shifts between the perspective of Agnes herself and those of her various captors.

The writing brilliantly evokes the rawness of an unforgiving landscape in a particular historical period. Descriptions of the dried sheep bladders which form the window panes in the farmhouse; the sacks of salted cod in cellars; and fish being gutted on stones convey the brutality of the landscape, and the vulnerability of the people who live there, with enchanting lyricism.

The landscape features so prominently in the book that it is almost a character in its own right. While the story is set in an icelandic farming community, this could be any small community with its class divisions and conflicts. If you enjoy Tracy Chevalier’s writing then you should enjoy this. And if, like me, you are a lover of books as items to be treasured, treat yourself to the hardbacked version with its beautiful black-edged pages. I don’t want to hide my copy on the bookshelves! Review by by A.B. of Chapel

The Carrier by Sophie Hannah

thecarrier

An overnight plane delay is bad. Having to share your hotel room with a complete stranger is worse. But that is only the beginning of Gaby Struthers’ problems. So how does Lauren Cookson know so much about her? They’ve never met. How does she know that the love of Gaby’s life has been accused of murder. Why is she telling her that he is innocent? And why is she so terrified of Gaby?

The Wimbledon Poisoner by Nigel Williams

wimbledon poisonerHenry Farr is forty years old. He is suburban, average, conventional and desperate to be rid of his wife, Elinor.

Inspired by a grisly episode in Wimbledon’s local history, Farr begins to concoct a recipe for the perfect murder. But his plans go terribley, terribley wrong and before long poor Henry’s best efforts to set himself free see him spiralling wildly out of control.

This book has a certain strain of wicked, black comic humour seething with middle class confusion and existential bewilderment. A bit like a theatrical Brian Rix farce?

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford

Inspired by a badge his father wore as a child – ‘I am Chinese,’ Jamie Ford has written an amazing story based in Seattle shortlyafter the bombing of Pearl Harbour. He encompasses xenaphobian struggles for cultural identity, family loyalties and betrayals. Including factual events involving the internment of people of Japanese heritage into huge campsdeep inside America. At the heart of the story is Henry a 12 year old boy of Chinese heritage and two friendships he develops. One with a black musician and the other a touching and forbidden friendship with Japanese, Keiko.

I loved this book, it wrapped itself around me and I didn’t want the story to end. I would love to know what happens next! Review by by H.W. of Chinley

The Beginner’s Goodbye by Anne Tyler

A man struggling with bereavment; his wife killed in a most unfortunate way. It is handled with humour, tinged with helpless acceptance. It makes you think about life…

Toby’s Room by Pat Barker

tobysroomWe have all been here before: all is not quiet on the Western Front. Pat Barker is haunted by the wholesale destruction of lads and landscape – and how art can (and did) depict the First World War.

It is more than 20 years since Regeneration, the first part of her award-winning trilogy, was published. Five years ago she returned to the trenches in Life Class. and now her vew novel re-introduces us to students Elinor Brooke, Paul Tarrant and Kit Neville and their teacher at the Slade, Henry Tonks.

Once again the story skillfully moves between oast and present seamlessly weaving fact and fiction. Elinor, Paul and Kit are traumatised people. Even when the guns fall silent, these survivors are destined to fight their own battles for a long time.

The Reading Group by Elizabeth Noble

readinggroup

The reading group in this novel is really just a device to bring together these women, have them tell their stories and develop relationships with each other. The book opens with a quote from Margaret Atwood ‘The real, hidden subject of a book group discussion is the members themselves.’

Like the women in this novel’s reading group, the lives of fellow book club members have unfolded during many a meeting and they have looked to the group, at times, to provide emotional sustenance in difficult times. The books mentioned are given a very light touch by the reading group and there is no real literary criticism at their meetings but the books are always a backdrop to the scenes and to each of their lives.

Not meant to be a serious deep meaningful insight into Book/Reading Groups but a warm, often funny touching novel about women learning to read between the lines ….

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